Sent: 23 January 2011 21:20
Subject: V S Update - dates (and races to enter), Brass Monkey results, Barcelona and Dartmoor reports

 

More dates

 

Tuesday 25 January – track training 7pm prompt at Leeds Met Carnegie

 

Sunday 30 January - Peco Race 4 – at John Smeaton – good turnout required, another win for the men and women wll put us in the lead

 

Tuesday 1 February – Tuesday training at Leos followed by Lasagne – order by 10pm Sunday 30 January to food@valleystriders.org.uk stating whether you want carnivore or vegetarian lasagne and whether you also want apple pie.

 

Saturday 5 February – Rombalds Stride 23 miles trail (V S Grand Prix) – no entries on the day.  http://www.ldwa.org.uk/challenge_events/show_event.php?list_option=S&list_type=F&event_id=4341 for details, you can enter on a Standard Entry Form (see LDWA website)

 

Sunday 6 February – Dewsbury 10k (V S Grand Prix) – no entries on the day.  Go to www.ukresults.net. The paper entry form on the website says entries closed yesterday but the online entry on www.ukresults.net is definitely still open and, if I remember from last year, is likely to stay open for another week (but don’t hold me to it!)

 

Saturday 26 February – Noonstone race (first race in V S Fell Championship) – rest of Fell Championship programme will be published on website soon and in next V S Update

 

London Marathon Places Available

 

A message from Sara Korn. If you are interested, please contact Sara directly:

 

We have 5 places in this year’s London marathon to fill due to injury. 

 

Do you have any runners in your club that may be interested in filling a place?  They would need to raise a minimum of £200 which covers the cost of the place –the sponsorship can then be split 50/50 to a charity of their choice.

 

Kind regards, Sara

 

Sara Korn

 

Fundraising Co-Ordinator

t:     +44(0)113 218-5843

f:     +44(0)113 203-4915

 

The Marjorie and Arnold Ziff Community Centre

311 Stonegate Road

Moortown

Leeds

LS17 6AZ

 

Brass Monkey – race results

 

It was 5 degrees Centigrade so not cold enough to freeze any parts of a brass monkey but most runners were pleased with this and decided not to argue the trades descriptions act with Knavesmire Harriers.

 

Andy May looked resplendently bright in his brand new Valley Striders vest and was first of 41 Striders in 10th place overall.  Only 2 places behind was Rob De’Giovanni.  Quite a few PBs I believe.

 

Three new members (joined 2011) were in action and I’m allocating points to them even though none of them wore a Striders vest.  Richard Balshaw has joined us 2nd claim so was running in a Bingley vest.  Simon Duckworth and Paul Milnes only joined on Tuesday to no time to get to Ilkley.

 

Points are allocated on chip times.

 

Full results at  http://www.sportsystems.co.uk/ss/results/Brass%20Monkey%20Half%20Marathon/563

 

                      Chip       G.P   Gun       Gun

                      Time       Pts   Pos      Time

                                                 

 Andy May           1:13:58      100     8   1:13:59

 Rob De'Giovanni    1:14:25       99    12   1:14:26

 Richard Balshaw    1:18:04       98    40   1:18:06   2nd claim

 Jeremy Ladyman     1:19:54       98    60   1:19:59

 Rich Smith         1:19:54       98    61   1:20:01

 Paul Kaiser        1:21:33       96    90   1:21:43

 Kevin McMullan     1:21:34       95    89   1:21:40

 Ian Sanderson      1:22:34       94   104   1:22:45

 Dan Murray         1:22:40       93   106   1:22:49

 Ian Rosser         1:23:43       92   119   1:24:00

 Gwil Thomas        1:23:55       91   118   1:23:58

 Roy Huggins        1:24:44       90   142   1:24:51

 James Tarran       1:27:55       89   207   1:28:11

 Nick Barnes        1:30:32       88   274   1:30:42

 Gary Mann          1:30:35       87   281   1:30:57

 John Wallace       1:30:46       86   286   1:31:07

 Eric Green         1:30:49       85   278   1:30:55

 Liz Wood           1:30:52       84   289   1:31:12

 John Batchelor     1:30:56       83   294   1:31:16

 Alistair Smyth     1:31:22       82   302   1:31:43

 Simon Redshaw      1:32:10       81   332   1:32:43

 Tom Button         1:32:17       80   326   1:32:37

 Myra Jones         1:34:03       79   381   1:33:41

 Bob Jackson        1:34:44       78   392   1:35:02

 Gary Sutherland    1:36:17       77   449   1:36:59

 Patrick Barrett    1:36:31       76   443   1:36:47

 Mike Higgins       1:37:41       75   494   1:38:03

 Joe Hanney         1:37:45       74   511   1:38:20

 Paul White         1:37:46       73   495   1:38:03

 Keith Brewster     1:37:59       72   515   1:38:26

 Sue Sunderland     1:38:10       71   522   1:38:37

 Mick Tinker        1:39:04       70   552   1:39:39

 Paul Sanderson     1:39:19       69   554   1:39:43

 Ged Coll           1:41:17       68   641   1:42:08

 Michaela McGarry   1:41:29       67   674   1:43:03

 Pat McGarry        1:41:29       67   675   1:43:03

 Leroy Sutton       1:41:56       65   644   1:42:16

 Simon Duckworth    1:43:28       64   701   1:43:48

 Chloe Hudson       1:45:40       63   791   1:46:71

 Ruth Warren        1:47:21       62   864   1:49:09

 Sarah Smith        1:48:49       61   875   1:49:32

 Paul Holloway      1:49:31       60   915   1:50:48

 Kirsty Everett     2:00:39       59  1237   2:01:17

 Paul Milnes        2:11:01       58  1422   2:11:01

 

See website for Grand Prix table after 4 races.  The battle for the Men’s Championship is already interesting as a different runner has won each race – Gwil, Rob, Simon and Andy.  79 Striders have already run 1 or more race, and there are 7 ever-presents – Gwil, Kevin, Ian S, Dan M, Alistair, Bob J, and Sue.  But how many ever-presents will there be after the weekend 5 and 6 February – will anyone run Rombalds and Dewsbury? (not me, I did it one year and never again!)

 

 

Finally, two race reports that I’ve just found in my inbox!

 

Barcelona 10k – race report from Tim Towler

 

The idea of running a race abroad on New Year’s Eve, and so spending New  Year away, has appealed to me for a little while. A 10k race in one of our favourite cities, Barcelona, seemed a perfect opportunity. We booked accommodation and our race entry through Running Crazy, and the flights ourselves. Carole, Jake and I, together with another family, who were there more for the trip than the run, flew out on 30 December.

 

The race itself starts in the daylight at 5.30pm on New Year’s Eve. With 9,000 runners the start is a little chaotic. However the race numbers that had been arranged for us were in the “runners” pen behind the elite athletes. Once you managed to get into the pen and the race started, you were able to get into your stride pretty quickly. The course is very much round the central part of Barcelona , east of La Rambla, for those who know the city, and flat and fast. Indeed sub 29 minute times were expected if the Africans had been there “prize hunting”, but as they were not the winning time was a little outside 30 minutes. Whilst the atmosphere was good I was a little disappointed with the numbers watching, for such a large event in a big city. I did however hear a couple of screams for “Valleeeee”, as I ran past in my Striders vest. As the race unfolds it quickly turns dark, and it is night when you finish. The temperature was 14 degrees when we ran, a change to the temperatures we had been experiencing at home. Nobody had told the Spanish that the weather was warm and ideal for an evening 10k – most of the local runners had at least 2 layers of clothes on!

 

We were pleased with our times – Jake took 6 minutes of his PB, running 52.26. Carole finished in exactly 50.00 and I ran 2 seconds slower than in the Abbey Dash, 40.37. We had good reason to be satisfied. The night before had been neither early or sober!

 

I can recommend the travel company Running Crazy for those wanting to take part in overseas races. This small company run by Malcolm Hargreaves, target various races throughout  the year and provide an excellent service in organising trips for groups of varying sizes of runners. You are met at the airport and guided to your hotel. Your race numbers are collected and delivered to you. A group pasta meal is organised for the night before the race. You are guided to the start of the race and back to the airport when it is time to leave, and by guided I mean they travel with you so you don’t get lost. Malcolm is a sort of Patrick Barrett – but much more sober!!

 

OMM 2010 Dartmoor – race report from Mick Loftus

 

Another October and another OMM.  Mick Wrench and I entered the Elite Class again.  This time down south on Dartmoor.  After a long drive down and a night in a Travellodge we re-checked our kit and lined up for the start.

 

Due to the lack of significant climbs on Dartmoor the course planners had to make the routes longer than normal, just to make sure they were challenging enough.  For our class, that resulted in a straight line distance of 52km on day 1 and 37km on day 2 or around 89km in total. Neither Mick or I knew Dartmoor at all, except its reputation for mist, rain, bogs and difficult navigation.

 

However, on day 1 Dartmoor was on its best behaviour; visibility was good, it was wet underfoot but not too swamp-like.  There was a lot of tussock grass but with many pony or sheep trods through it.  We trotted through the day pretty successfully.  There was little strategic route choice, just lots of micro navigation decisions. After about 3 hours the lead teams started to pass us.  They were moving quickly and efficiently - very impressive.  Due to various constraints, the course included two sections of road running which was a bit of a shock.

 

Some 2 hours after the winners had arrived we shuffled into the finish after about 8 hours and 13 minutes of running and uphill marching.  We turned out to be in 28th place.

 

Typically, just as we arrived the weather started to deteriorate.  The rain came down and the wind on the exposed campsite picked up.  We got chilled quickly while putting the tent up but immediately felt better once we were squeezed inside it.  As the evening progressed the rain and wind increased.  We ate our dehydrated food as the tent started to drip.  By 3 am my down sleeping bag was pretty soggy, the wind was battering my end of the tiny tent resulting in wet nylon slapping me in the face every 30 seconds or so.  I wasn't getting a great night's sleep.  At this point I decide to put on full waterproofs and then get back in the sleeping bag.  Exhaustion took over and I dozed fitfully for periods until we were woken at 5:45 by the countdown to the start.  The top teams begin at 7:00 but we could have a lie in (sort of!) before getting ready for an 8:27 start.

 

It was actually a relief to get started on day 2.  We wore our waterproof tops all day through various grades of rain, drizzle or mist.  Navigation proved to be tougher on day 2 with some long legs across largely featureless wastes of bog and tussock.  All the overnight rain seemed to just sit in the top layer of peat making Dartmoor's reputation well justified.  The streams had also transformed into dangerous rivers.  Quite early in the day we had to resort to linking arms to cross a swollen stream.

 

We managed the hard long sections reasonably well but later in the day the tiredness and cold started to affect our decisions.  At one relatively easy control we lost over 30 minutes, going wrong repeatedly and getting disorientated.  We stopped and sheltered behind a Tor (big rock outcrop), put on more clothes and ate some food.  We worked out a damage limitation navigation strategy, aiming for a significant feature and working backwards to the control.  This worked in the end and we pressed on.

 

The next challenge was a big scary river crossing.  A number of teams had collected there.  In the end we decided to do a big detour to a bridge.  However, we found Mountain Rescue supervising a rope across the river a short distance away.  This still required almost full emersion while clinging onto a rope to make the crossing.  Another 15 minutes at least were 'wasted' here.

 

Now, we could dare to think that completing the event was achievable. The next few controls passed with further minor confusions and mistakes but we got through.  We finished after 7 hours and 24 minutes.

 

Our total time was 15:37 for the 54+ miles. We came 37th out of 47 finishers which was a bit disappointing but who cares, we did it.  Our finish line photo shows two wide grins.